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Introduction to the New Testament: Romans to Revelation - Lesson 20

Philippians

Paul contrasts the condescention and the exaltation of Christ, and addresses specific situations in the Philippian church.

Craig Blomberg
Introduction to the New Testament: Romans to Revelation
Lesson 20
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Philippians

Letters of Paul

Part 8

VIII. Philippians

A. The Place of Paul's Imprisonment

1. Caesarea?

a. Arguments in favor

i. Plots against his life

ii. Presence of Praetorium

b. Arguments against

i. Distance from Europe

ii. No sense of release

2. Ephesus?

a. Arguments in favor

i. Very close by

ii. Fits travel plans

b. Arguments against

i. No clear biblical support

ii. No high level Roman leadership

3. Rome?

a. Arguments in favor

i. Dominant church tradition

ii. Caeser's household there

b. Arguments against

i. Future plans originally different

ii. Time short for travels noted

B. Key Verses for Philippian's Context

1. Paul contemplates death (1:21-28, 2:17)

2. The problem of rival teachers (1:15-18)

3. The problem of false teachers 3:2-6) [Does 3:17-19 tie in or not?]

4. Roman colonial hostility (1:27-30, 3:20)

C. Philippians Outline as a Family/Friendship Letter

1. Chapters 1-2

a. Address and greeting (1:1-2)

b. Prayer for recipients (1:3-11)

c. Reassurance about sender (1:12-26)

d. Request for reassurance about recipients (1:27-2:18)

e. Information about movement of intermediaries (2:19-30)

2. Chapters 3-4

a. Special warnings (3:1-4:1)

b. Special instructions and "thankless thank yous" (4:2-20) [see esp. v. 13 in context]

c. Exchange of greetings with third parties (4:21-22)

d. Closing wish for health (4:23)

D. The Philippian Hymn (2:6-11)

1. Stanza 1: The Condescension of Christ

a. The Attitude

i. Who being in very nature God

ii. Did not consider equality with God

iii. Something to be grasped

b. The Abandonment

i. But made himself nothing

ii. Taking the very nature of a servant

iii. Being made in human likeness

c. The Humiliation

i. And being found in appearance as a man

ii. He humbled himself

iii. And became obedient to death

iv. EVEN DEATH ON A CROSS!

2. Stanza 2: The Exaltation of Christ

a. The Restoration

i. Therefore God exalted him to the highest place

ii. And gave him the name

iii. That is above every name

b. The Adoration

i. That at the name of Jesus

ii. Every knee should bow

iii. In heaven and on earth and under the earth

c. The Confession

i. And every tongue confess

ii. That Jesus Christ is Lord

iii. To the glory of God the Father

E. Philippians 4:6-8


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Class Resources
  • Paul was trained as a Pharisee and persecuted Christians because he considered them enemies of God. After his conversion experience, he travelled in Asia Minor and Europe preaching the gospel and planting churches. Many of the letters in the New Testament are ones that he wrote to these churches.

  • Paul was trained as a Pharisee and persecuted Christians because he considered them enemies of God. After his conversion experience, he travelled in Asia Minor and Europe preaching the gospel and planting churches. Many of the letters in the New Testament are ones that he wrote to these churches.

  • Paul was trained as a Pharisee and persecuted Christians because he considered them enemies of God. After his conversion experience, he travelled in Asia Minor and Europe preaching the gospel and planting churches. Many of the letters in the New Testament are ones that he wrote to these churches.

  • A key theme in the book of Galatians is how the Law and the Gospel are related.

  • A key theme in the book of Galatians is how the Law and the Gospel are related.

  • A key theme in the book of Galatians is how the Law and the Gospel are related.

  • The return of Christ is a central theme in the letters to the Thessalonians.

  • The return of Christ is a central theme in the letters to the Thessalonians.

  • Paul addresses the extremes of asceticism and hedonism, as well as concerns regarding marriage, spiritiual gifts and the resurrection.

  • Paul addresses the extremes of asceticism and hedonism, as well as concerns regarding marriage, spiritiual gifts and the resurrection.

  • Paul addresses the extremes of asceticism and hedonism, as well as concerns regarding marriage, spiritiual gifts and the resurrection.

  • Paul responds to specific situations in the Corinthian church including emphasizing a correct perspective on giving and encouragement to see God's redemptive purpose in our suffering.

  • Paul responds to specific situations in the Corinthian church including emphasizing a correct perspective on giving and encouragement to see God's redemptive purpose in our suffering.

  • Paul wrote Romans as a systematic exposition of the gospel.

  • Paul wrote Romans as a systematic exposition of the gospel.

  • In Colossians, Paul emphasizes the deity of Christ. Philemon was written to a gentlema Paul knows to encourage him to welcome back Onesimus, his runaway slave, who became a disciple of Christ and was returning.

  • In Colossians, Paul emphasizes the deity of Christ. Philemon was written to a gentlema Paul knows to encourage him to welcome back Onesimus, his runaway slave, who became a disciple of Christ and was returning.

  • Paul describes to the followers of Jesus in Ephesus, who they are in Christ, and the ethical implications for how they should live their daily lives.

  • Paul describes to the followers of Jesus in Ephesus, who they are in Christ, and the ethical implications for how they should live their daily lives.

  • Paul contrasts the condescention and the exaltation of Christ, and addresses specific situations in the Philippian church.

  • Paul writes to encourage and instruct Timothy and Titus, both of whom are young pastors.

  • Paul writes to encourage and instruct Timothy and Titus, both of whom are young pastors.

  • Both 1 Timothy and 1 Corinthians contain key passages addressing the roles of men and women in the local church.

  • Both 1 Timothy and 1 Corinthians contain key passages addressing the roles of men and women in the local church.

  • The book of James emphasizes that people demonstrate that they have true faith in Christ by their good works.

  • The book of James emphasizes that people demonstrate that they have true faith in Christ by their good works.

  • Hebrews is written to Hebrew Christians to demonstrate how Christ fulfilled the Mosaic covenant.

  • Hebrews is written to Hebrew Christians to demonstrate how Christ fulfilled the Mosaic covenant.

  • 1 Peter encourages followers of Christ to persevere even though they face persecution.

  • 1 Peter encourages followers of Christ to persevere even though they face persecution.

  • Jude and 2 Peter both emphasize refuting false teachers.

  • Major themes in John's epistles are sin, the love of God, the humanity and deity of Jesus, and the importance of obedience.

  • Major themes in John's epistles are sin, the love of God, the humanity and deity of Jesus, and the importance of obedience.

  • Revelation focuses on God's plan for cosmic history and the importance of perseverance during difficult circumstances.

  • Revelation focuses on God's plan for cosmic history and the importance of perseverance during difficult circumstances.

  • Revelation focuses on God's plan for cosmic history and the importance of perseverance during difficult circumstances.

  • Revelation focuses on God's plan for cosmic history and the importance of perseverance during difficult circumstances.

Using the English New Testament, this course surveys the New Testament epistles and the apocalypse. Issues of introduction and content receive emphasis as well as a continual focus on the theology of evangelism and on the contemporary relevance of the variety of issues these documents raise for contemporary life.