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Wine-skins

(chemeth (Ge 21:14 margin), n’odh (Jud 4:19 "’bottle") nebhel, nebhel (1Sa 10:3 margin), (’obh) (Job 32:19); askos (Mt 9:17; Mr 2:22; Lu 5:37; compare askoputine, Judith 10:5, the Revised Version (British and American) "leathern bottle")): These words are all used to designate skins for the containing of liquids, nebhel, however, being the most common in the case of wine. The Israelite, like the modern Arabic and Syrian, used mainly the skin of the goat and the sheep, but the skins of the ox and the camel have also been put to this purpose. The skin is removed from the animal by drawing it over the body from the neck downward, half the skin on each of the limbs being also retained. It is then tanned, the hair cut close, turned inside out, and has all the openings save one closed with cords, when it is ready for use. The reference to "a wineskin in the smoke" in Ps 119:83 is generally explained on the supposition of its being hung there for mellowing purposes, but this can scarcely be