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William Grimshaw

1708-1763. Anglican clergyman. Born in Lancashire of obscure parentage, he was educated at Christ's College, Cambridge, and became a typcial curate of his times until a long spiritual struggle culminated in a conversion experience in 1742. He knew nothing then of Whitefield or Wesley, but like the former was converted through reading Scripture and seventeenth-century books. He was incumbent of Haworth, Yorkshire (afterward famous for the Brontes), in a wild country with rough, illiterate people. His uncouth, racy preaching with plenty of humor; his athletic prowess that won their respect; his affection for sinner and saint; and his passionate sense of Christ as Savior made him a powerful evangelist. He transformed the whole place. Before sermon he would go out and round up shirkers with a riding crop, and his preaching brought many hearers from a distance. He took particular pains with the very poor, the isolated, and the sick. Because neighboring parishes never heard the Gospel, he