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Wheel

WHEEL (Heb. ’ôphan, galgal, gilgal, ’ovnayim, pa‘am, Gr. trochos). Probably at first just a disk of wood cut from a log, but quite early developed into something resembling the modern device. When the Egyptians with their chariots pursued the Israelites at the Red Sea (Exod.14.24-Exod.14.25), the Lord took off their chariot wheels. In 1Kgs.7.30-1Kgs.7.33 where the bases of the great “sea” of Solomon’s temple are described, reference is made to wheels with their axles, rings, spokes, and hubs, showing that by Solomon’s time (c. 1000 b.c.) the wheel was quite developed and was similar to modern wagon wheels. Cart wheels were used for threshing some kinds of grain, but not cummin (Isa.28.27). The word for “potter’s wheel” means literally “two stones” (Jer.18.3). In ancient times two circular stone disks were joined by a short shaft, and so spun. Today, the shaft is longer and the wheels are of wood.