Way

WAY. There are about twenty-five Hebrew and Greek words translated “way” in the Bible. It is often used metaphorically to describe the conduct or manner of life, whether of God or of man (Deut.5.33; Ps.1.6; Prov.16.17). In the NT God’s plan of salvation is called “the way of the Lord” (Matt.3.3). The term is also used to mean Christianity or Judaism (Acts.9.2; Acts.19.9; Acts.22.4).


WAY. In addition to the literal meaning of a path over which or direction in which one moves, the word is extensively used in Eng. VSS in a fig. sense, denoting behavior patterns in animal life, movements in nature, varieties of human and divine conduct, action, and intention, and attitudes, habits, customs, spirit, plans, in human and divine life.


a. Natural processes: the way of lightning and thunder (Job 28:26; 38:25), movement of light (38:19, 24), the life of the ant (Prov 6:6), behavior of an eagle, serpent, a ship’s movement, a man’s courting (30:19).







c. In Acts “the Way” refers to the Christian faith and manner of life followed by the Lord’s disciples, and held in contempt by their enemies (9:2; 19:9, 23; 22:4, 14; 24:22).

d. Of Jesus Christ, the final and perfect revealer, and in His person and by His sacrificial death, the living and personal way to God, His holiness, and salvation: teacher of the way in truth (Matt 22:16; Mark 12:14; Luke 1:79); Himself the only “Way” to God (John 14:4-6); and the One who opens up the way into the holiest by His sacrifice (Heb 9:8; 10:19, 20).

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia (1915)


The word highway is used to denote a prominent road, such a one for example as was in ancient times maintained for royal travel and by royal authority. It is always used in the literal sense except in Pr 15:19; 16:17, where it is a course of conduct.

See also PATH, PATHWAY.