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Vestiarian Controversy

The dispute in the English Church over clerical dress which began about 1550 and reached its peak in 1566. The controversy was in two parts. The first, principally involving [[John Hooper]],* who had returned from exile in Switzerland, took place in 1550-51 in the reign of Edward VI.* Hooper refused to be consecrated bishop of Gloucester if he had to wear the surplice and rochet as required by the Prayer Book of 1549. Eventually he compromised, but only after a literary debate with N. Ridley* had begun, the advice of Jan à Lasco,* [[Martin Bucer]],* and [[Peter Martyr]]* had been sought, and the Privy Council had acted. The second part came early in the reign of Queen [[Elizabeth I]],* who restored vestments in her royal chapel in 1549. In 1560 the bishops required their clergy to wear a cope during [[Holy Communion]] and a surplice in other services. The “hotter” Protestants in Parliament and Convocation protested about this compulsion. The authorities, however, pressed on and in 1566