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Trinitarians

The “Order of the Most Holy Trinity,” founded at Cerfroid, Meaux, in 1198 by [[John of Matha]]* and Felix of Valois, with approval from [[Innocent III]]. Known also as “Mathurins,” they followed an austere form of the Augustinian Rule, wearing a white habit. Devoting themselves to redeeming Christian captives, they took a fourth vow to sacrifice their own liberty if necessary, using one-third of their revenues as ransoms. By the fifteenth century there were 800 houses as collecting centers and hospitals; they were particularly numerous in the British Isles. A reform movement, the “Barefooted Trinitarians,” founded by Juan Bautista of the [[Immaculate Conception]] in Spain (1596), is the only surviving body, engaged in education, nursing, and ransoming of Negro slaves. Trinitarian nuns were affiliated from earliest times. The “Barefooted Trinitarian Sisters” date from 1612.