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Trans-Jordan

TRANS-JORDAN trănz jôr’ dən (בְּעֵ֣בֶר הַיַּרְדֵּ֔ן, tr. variously; the area usually designated as beyond the Jordan). This expression is commonly taken as referring to territory on the E side of the River Jordan. Cut through by numerous gorges, some with constant water flow, the soil produces abundant crops of grain even without irrigation. Palestine is rugged tableland, 2,000 to 3,000 ft. in elevation, with heights of around 5,000 ft. All E Pal. has been comprehended under the name Gilead (Deut 34:1; Josh 22:9). In the Gr. period the covering term for all was Coele-Syria (Jos. Antiq. I. xi. 5; XIII. xiii. 2f.). Generally, Trans-jordan can be reckoned from Dan in the far N, to Egypt and Saudi Arabia on the S and SE. On the E, the rather indefinite boundary extends to Iraq and Saudi Arabia. The Trans-jordan of OT times embraced Edom (S of the Dead Sea), Moab, Ammon, Gilead, and Bashan. Pre-Mosaic references to this territory occur (Gen 13:10ff.; 14:12ff.; 32:10). The “King’s Highwa