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Tiglath-pileser

TIGLATH-PILESER (tĭg'lăth-pĭ-lē'zêr, Assyr. Tukulti-apil-esharra, Heb. tiglath-pil’eser, tilleghath-pilne’ser). A famous name among the Assyrian kings. Tiglath-Pileser I (1114-1074 b.c.) was a conqueror whose campaigns extended northward to the vicinity of Lake Van and westward to the Mediterranean. His annals tell of his efforts to establish a world empire, but his reign was followed by several centuries in which Assyria was weak. In 745 a usurper took the Assyrian throne and assumed the name Tiglath-Pileser. Tiglath-Pileser III (745-727) injected new vigor into the Assyrian Empire, which had suffered another decline after a resurgence of power in the ninth century. He engaged in campaigns to east and west and was recognized as king even in Babylon, where he was known as Pulu. He is referred to as “Pul” in 2Kgs.15.19 and 1Chr.5.26. His annals list Azariah of Judah among the kings from whom he received tribute; the OT does not relate this account. (See D. D. Luckenbill, Ancient Records