Thomas Netter

c.1372-c.1430. Carmelite theologian. Known also as Thomas Walden from his birth at Saffron Walden, he is best known for his confutation of Wycliffe and the Lollards.* From his ordination in 1396, study at Oxford where Netter received the theological doctorate, and attendance in 1409 at the Council of Pisa, he gained a love for royalty and a hatred for the Lollards. As provincial of the Carmelite Order, Netter asked prayers for the young king Henry VI. His love made him thus bold, for Henry V had died in his arms and Netter preached the funeral sermon at Westminster. At Henry V's wish, Netter commenced his Doctrinale Fidei Ecclesiae Catholicae contra Wiclevistas et Hussitas in 1421. This major work approved by Martin V at Rome demolished the Lollard theses point by point. Martin requested a second book on the sacraments and a third on rites. Netter also prepared with help the Fasciculus zizaniorum, a fully documented source book of Lollardy, the only contemporary account to survive. He died in Rouen. Netter was a learned defender of Catholicism and a worthy opponent of Wycliffe.