Solafidianism

The doctrine that eternal salvation is had only through faith by grace in the work of Jesus Christ. This work of Christ is His obedience to the will of His Father and emptying or humbling of Himself. He died to reconcile man to God, overcoming sin, death, the devil, and hell as Victor and as the sacrifice and propitiation for all the sins of all men of all times, thereby obtaining the forgiveness of their sins. The acceptance and seal of this death by God is attested by Christ's resurrection and session. Justification of the sinner, therefore, is through faith, not as a work, but as a gift of God. Solafidianism opposes synergism in any form, whether it be Pelagianism* or Semi-Pelagianism* or any variations of these. It is not antinomian, but insists that good works are not necessary for salvation; they are the fruits of faith. The propounders of Solafidianism cite Scripture passages such as Galatians 2:16; 3:11; Ephesians 2:8; and Romans 4:5. Sola fide, “faith alone,” was one of the principles of the Reformers of the sixteenth century, together with sola gratia, and sola Scriptura; sometimes the three are brought together into one phrase, solus Christus.