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Scorpion

SCORPION (עַקְרָב, H6832; σκορπίος, G5026; scorpion all Eng. VSS). There is no problem about the tr., for this Heb. name is used today; one route up the great escarpment across the Negev is the Ascent of the Scorpions. Of the world’s 500 species some twelve are known from the various regions of Pal., from the Negev desert to the moist woodlands of the N. Even though they vary in size, proportions and color, the outline of a scorpion, with its pair of heavy pincers and forward-curving sting-tipped tail, makes it immediately recognizable. Size itself is no indication of potency of venom; at least one Middle E species has a most serious sting, but none is likely to kill a healthy person. Scorpions are classified near the spiders and, like them, they are entirely carnivorous. The sting is used with precision to paralyze the prey, which is then consumed by pumping digestive juices into it and sucking out the broken-down tissues.