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Scarlet

SCARLET (תּוֹלָע, H9355, תּוֹלֵעָה, H9357, שָׁנִי, H9106, כַּרְמִיל, H4147). The dye used for coloring the wool and thread a scarlet color undoubtedly came from the insect, Coccus ilicis. This is an insect pest which attacks the species of oak called Quercus coccifera, commonly called the kermes oak. The insect has sometimes been called the kermes bug. The oak is evergreen, never grows taller than twenty ft., and is of a dense sturdy habit. The acorns are borne in ones or twos, about one inch long, and they are half enclosed in a spiny cup. The insect which produces the dye is a scale which soon covers the young branches, if not controlled. These scales produce a white fluff similar to cotton wool, similar to the American blight (wooly aphis) and to the insect which attacks the cacti known as prickly pear—the cochineal, from which the red culinary coloring comes. Actually, although the name “scarlet” is used, the shade of color produced by this insect is far more crimson. It is be