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Samos

SAMOS (sā'mŏs, Gr. Samos, height). An island off western Asia Minor colonized by Ionians in the eleventh century b.c. . It was notable for metalwork, woolen products, and probably utility pottery, though it is not certain that “Samian ware” necessarily implied a large native industry of this sort. Samos joined the Ionian revolt but was treated generously by the Persians, fought for Xerxes at Salamis, but later joined the Athenian confederacy. With typical fickleness she deserted this union also, and her revolt was crushed by Pericles himself (441). After this she was loyal to Athens, and the Samians were given citizenship by a grateful Athens after Aegospotami, the last battle of the Peloponnesian War in 405. Samos was accepted by Lysander in 404 and regained by Athens only in 365. Samos produced the moralists and poets Aesop, Ibycus, and Anacreon, and the astronomer Conon. Paul touched at Samos on his last voyage to Jerusalem (Acts.20.15).