Rosminians

The Institute of Charity founded by Antonio Rosmini-Serbati,* the Italian philosopher, at the instigation of Maddalena Canossa (1828). It was formally approved by Gregory XVI (1839). Members profess the three religious vows and live retired in prayer and study until called by the pope or by a particular need to some kind of external work such as teaching, preaching, missions, and literature. There are two grades: the presbyters (who take a fourth vow of obedience to the pope) and the coadjutors. There is no distinctive habit, only the cassock. In 1832 the congregation became associated with the Sisters of Providence, founded by one of Rosmini's disciples. The Rosminians went to England in 1835, introducing there the clerical (or Roman) collar and other innovations. There are houses also in Eire and the USA. The central house of the Institute is at St. John at the Latin Gate, Rome.