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Quirinius

QUIRINIUS kwĭ rĭn’ ĭ əs (Κυρήνιος, G3256, Luke 2:2). KJV CYRENIUS, sī rē’ nĭ es. The full name is Publius Sulpicius Quirinius. Transliteration into Gr., and then transliteration into Eng. without reference to the Lat., led to the mistaken form “Cyrenius” in KJV (Luke 2:2). Quirinius was what the Romans called a “new man.” Like Cicero, he came to office and held the consulship (12 b.c.) and provincial governorships without the aid and advantage of a family tradition in politics or administration. Tacitus devoted a brief chapter to Quirinius when he recorded his death in a.d. 21. He wrote: About the same time he [Tiberius] desired of the senate that “the decease of Sulpicius Quirinius might be celebrated by a public funeral.” Quirinius was born at Lanuvium, a muncipal town, and was nowise related to the ancient patrician family of the Sulpicii; but being a brave soldier, was for his active services rewarded with the consulship under Augustus, and soon after with a triumph, for drivin