Pot

POT. The translation of more than a dozen Hebrew and Greek words. Most of them referred to utensils for holding liquids and solid substances such as grain or ashes. The Hebrew sîr was the most common pot used in cooking (2Kgs.4.38; Jer.1.13). It was also the vessel that held ashes (Exod.27.3). Some of these vessels were made of metal and others of clay, and there were a great variety of sizes and shapes. Their chief NT use was for water or wine (Mark.7.4; John.2.6 kjv; niv “pitchers, jars”).

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia (1915)

pot: A term used as the translation of a number of Hebrew and Greek words whose fundamental meaning seems to describe them as intended for the most part to hold liquid or semi-liquid substances, but the pots of Ex 27:3 are intended to hold ashes.


(2) parur (Nu 11:8; 1Sa 2:14), a vessel for boiling; in Jud 6:19, a vessel for holding broth.

(3) dudh, rendered "pot" in Ps 81:6 in the King James Version, "basket" in the Revised Version (British and American); "pot" both the King James Version and the Revised Version (British and American) in Job 41:20.

(4) tsintseneth (Ex 16:33), the jar in which the manna was placed. This jar or pot is mentioned in Heb 9:4 under the name stamnos.

(5) ’acon (2Ki 4:2), some kind of jar for holding oil.

(6) xestes (Mr 7:4), some kind of household utensil.

Mention may also be made of the word rendered "pot" in Le 6:28 the King James Version, where the Revised Version (British and American) renders more correctly by the general term "vessel"; for the King James Version "pots" (Ps 68:13) the Revised Version (British and American) substitutes "sheepfolds." The root is uncertain. Those who render "sheepfolds" connect with the related root in Ge 49:14; Jud 5:16. Others render "fireplaces" or "ash heaps." See also "range for pots," in Le 11:35; "pots," Jer 35:5 the King James Version, correctly "bowls" the Revised Version (British and American); "refining pots" in Pr 17:3; 27:21.

See also FOOD.

Walter R. Betteridge

See also

  • Potter