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Polyglot Bibles

Bibles which print the text in several languages. One might point back for the origins, at least in intention, to the Hexapla of Origen in the third century, but from Origen to printing no further known experiments of like proportions were attempted, because of the difficulties involved in hand-copying. Origen's work did not completely disappear, and various bilingual fragments of Scripture portions also survive. In 1502 Francisco Jiménes* de Cisneros began a comprehensive edition of Scripture; his death in 1517, and the delay in obtaining papal sanction, postponed publication of his six- volumed “[[Complutensian Polyglot]]”* until 1522. Its OT presented a revised Hebrew Massoretic Text, the Lucianic version of the Greek text, and the Vulgate Latin. Its NT offered Greek and Latin. The sixth volume added dictionaries and a grammar, completing a pattern which the derivative polyglots were to follow.