Philologus

PHILOLOGUS (fī-lŏl'ō-gŭs, Gr. Philologos, fond of learning). A believer in Rome to whom Paul sent a salutation (Rom.16.15).


PHILOLOGUS fĭ lŏl’ ə gəs (Φιλόλογος, G5807, a lover of learning, learned). The first of five Christians to whom Paul sent greetings (Rom 16:15). The group, of which Philologus was apparently the leader, formed another house church in Rome (vv. 5, 10, 11, 15). His name is coupled with that of Julia, who may have been his wife or possibly his sister. If they were a Christian couple, Nereus and his sister prob. were their children.

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia (1915)

The name of a Roman Christian to whom Paul sent greetings (Ro 16:15). His name is coupled with that of Julia, who was probably his wife or sister. Philologus and those united with him in this salutation formed by themselves one of the "house churches" or groups in the Christian community. The name is found in inscriptions connected with the imperial household, with reference to one of which Bishop Lightfoot has the following note: "It has been supposed that the name Philologus was given by the master to the freedman mentioned in this inscription, as being appropriate to his office (Friedlander I, 89, 160). .... If so, some light is thrown on the probable occupation of the Philologus of Paul" (Phil, 177, note 1).