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Passion

The most important and far-reaching occurrence of the term is the phrase in the prologue to Acts, ζω̂ντα μετὰ τὸ παθει̂ν αὐτὸν, “alive after his passion.” This phrase was tr. by St. Jerome (c. a.d. 400) as Lat. “vivum post passionem suam,” which follows the koine syntax exactly, even the term rendering Gr. pathein is cognate, namely Lat. patior. This same style was followed by [[John Wycliffe]] (1320-1384) and by subsequent Eng. VSS that retained the term “passion” in this special sense of the death and burial of Christ. It is evident from the Lucan use in Acts 1:3 that this term summarizes the major portion and intent of Luke’s gospel. International Standard Bible Encyclopedia (1915) pash’-un, pash’-unz: "Passion" is derived from Latin passio, which in turn is derived from the verb patior, with the root, pat-. The Latin words are connected with the Greek root, path-, which appears in a large number of derivatives. And in Greek, Latin, and English (with other languages in additio