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New Zealand

Christianity was founded in [[New Zealand]] by nineteenth-century European missionaries and settlers, with a leaven of American influence. Anglican missions (1814) followed by Wesleyans (1822) and Roman Catholics (1838) made slow progress. Missionaries were frequently used by astute chiefs like Hongi (1777-1828) to further their political aims. Communication was difficult, and missionary lives were more persuasive than their preaching. They were often peacemakers in tribal wars, and freed slaves frequently assisted the work of conversion ahead of missionaries. The King Movement inspired by W. Tamihana (1802-66) combined Christian and Maori ideas, but aroused deep official suspicions. Bitter land wars and unjust confiscations gave the missions an irrevocable setback and inspired Hauhauism (c.1863) and Ringatu founded by Te Kooti (c.1830-93). By 1900 there were few Maori clergy, and even in the heavily Maori Waiapu Diocese no native synodsmen till 1900.