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Nahalal

NAHALAL, NAHALOL (nā'ha-lăl, nā'ha-lŏl). A town in Zeubulun whose inhabitants were not driven out but were subjected to forced labor. Perhaps this is Tell en-Nahal, north of the River Kishon, NE of Mount Carmel. In Josh.19.15 KJV has Nahallal, but it follows other versions by having Nahalal in Josh.21.35, Nahalol in Judg.1.30.


NAHALAL nā’ ə lăl (Heb. נַֽהֲלָל); KJV NAHALLAL in Joshua 19:15. NAHALOL in Judges 1:30. A city allotted to the tribe of Zebulun (Josh 19:15) and given to the Levites (21:35), but from which Zebulun was unable to expel the Canaanite inhabitants who dwelt among them, and became subject to forced labor (Judg 1:30). The locality is uncertain. Simons (GTT, p. 182) favors Tell el-Beida, S of Nahalal; Albright (“Contributions to the Historical Geography of Palestine,” AASOR, 2-3 [1923], 26) suggests Tell en-Nahl, situated N of the Kishon River near the S end of the Plain of Acco, near the modern settlement of Nahalal (see J. Simons, Geographical and Topographical Texts of the Old Testament. Leiden [1959], Map Number II a).

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia (1915)

A city in the territory of Zebulun assigned with its suburbs to the Merarite Levites, out of which the Canaanite inhabitants were not driven (Jos 19:15, the King James Version (incorrectly) "Nahallal"; Jos 21:35; Jud 1:30, "Nahalol"). In the Talmud Jerusalem (Meg., i.1) it is identified with Mahlul. This name might correspond either with `Ain Mahil, or with Ma`lul. The former lies about 3 1/2 miles Northeast of Nazareth on a hill near the eastern boundary of Zebulun. The latter is situated about 3 1/2 miles West of Nazareth, near the southern border of Zebulun. The change of "n" to "m" is not unusual.