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Mysia

MYSIA (mĭsh'ĭ-a, Gr. Mysia). A district occupying the NW end of Asia Minor bounded (proceeding clockwise from the west) by the Aegean, the Hellespont (i.e., the Dardanelles), the Propontis (i.e., the Sea of Marmora), Bithynia, Phrygia, and Lydia. There were five areas: (1) Mysia Minor along the northern coast. (2) Mysia Major, the SE hinterland, with Pergamum as its chief city. (3) Troas, a geographical unit in the NW angle between Mount Ida and the sea, the name deriving from the legend that it was under the rule of Troy, whose stronghold was a few miles inland at the entrance to the strait. It was a strategic area, a fact that no doubt accounted for the Achaean assault on Troy. It was also the scene of Alexander’s first clash with the Persians (on the Granicus River). (4) Aeolis or Aeolia. This was the southern part of the western coast, a linguistic and ethnological, rather than a geographical, unit. Near the end of the second millennium before Christ, Aeolian Greeks from Boeotia