Middin

MIDDIN (mĭd'ĭn, Heb. middîn). One of the six cities of Judah lying in the wilderness just west of the Dead Sea (Josh.15.61).


MIDDIN mĭd’ ən (מִדִּ֖ין). A town in the wilderness of Judah (Josh 15:61). It is prob. identical with modern Khirbet Abu Tabaq in el-Buqe’ah (the Valley of Achor).

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia (1915)

One of the six cities in the wilderness of Judah (Jos 15:61). There are not many possible sites. The Hebrew name may possibly survive in Khirbet Mird, a very conspicuous site with many ancient cisterns overlooking the plateau el Bukea`, above which it towers to a height of 1,000 ft.; it is the Mons Mardes of early Christian pilgrims; the existing remains are Byzantine. It is a site of great natural strength and was clearly once a place of some importance. The Greek reading Ainon, "place of springs," suggests the neighborhood of the extensive oasis of `Ain Feshkhah at the northwest corner of the Dead Sea where there are at Kh. Kumram remains of buildings and a rock-cut aqueduct. See PEF, III, 210, 212, Sh XVIII.