Marduk

MARDUK (mar'dūk, Heb. merōdhākh, Akkad. Marduk). A Babylonian god (Jer.50.2; kjv “Merodach”).


MARDUK mär’ dōōk. Marduk became chief god of the Babylonian pantheon at the time of Hammurabi. To him were transferred the functions and exploits of the storm-god and creator En-lil. His principal temple was the É-sag-ila, “the house that lifts up its head” in Babylon. In the myth and ritual of the Babylonian New Year Festival each spring his victory as champion of the gods was celebrated.

The Heb. form of Marduk is Merodach (Jer 50:2). This term is found in the personal names of Evil-Merodach, Merodach-baladin, and Mordecai. He is referred to simply as Bel (Jer 50:2; 51:44) where the OT recognizes the close connection of Marduk with Babylon.

Bibliography

E. Dhorme, Les Religions de Babylonie et d’Assyrie (1945), 139-150; J. Bottéro, La religion babylonienne (1952), 40, 41.