Kaspar Olevianus

1536-1587. Reformed theologian. Born at Trèves (Trier), he studied at Paris, Orléans, and Bourges, where he accepted Reformation ideas. The drowning of a Friend impelled him to become a Preacher. He studied theology in Geneva, Zurich, and Lausanne, becoming acquainted with Farel, Calvin, Peter Martyr, Beza, and Bullinger. He returned to Trèves to teach in the Latin school (1559), but his fervent preaching led to imprisonment. Invited by Elector Frederick III to Heidelberg, he became pastor of St. Peter's Church and helped to reconstruct the church on Reformed lines. With Zacharias Ursinus, he drafted the final revision of the Heidelberg Catechism. He was involved in an “Arian” controversy and voted for the death penalty for the “blasphemers.” Banished during a Lutheran reaction under Louis VI, he went to Berleberg, Wittgenstein, and to Hernorn, Nassau, where he established a complete Presbyterian organization. He also wrote New Testament commentaries.