Joseph Hall

1574-1656. Bishop of Norwich. He gained early distinction by publishing satirical verse, meditations, and (in 1610) a controversial work against the Brownists, John Robinson and John Smyth. James I made him dean of Worcester and in 1618 sent him as his representative to the Synod of Dort, where he advocated moderation and mutual charity. Though brought up a Calvinist, he regarded the Church of Rome as corrupt but still catholic. As bishop of Exeter from 1627, he secured conformity by a conciliatory policy toward the Puritans which was regarded with suspicion by Archbishop Laud.* In 1640 Hall published his Divine Right of Episcopacy, and his Humble Remonstrance to the High Court of Parliament (1640-41) brought a reply from five Puritans whose initials made the name “Smectymnuus.” In 1641 he was translated to Norwich, but the revenues of his see were sequestrated by Parliament. His Hard Measure relates his subsequent poverty and sufferings.