Irish Articles

1615. The Church of Ireland* had drawn up twelve short articles of religion in 1566. A convocation of the Irish Church held between 1613 and 1615, and moved by a spirit of independence, decided to prepare a set of articles that would reflect their particular beliefs. The new articles, 104 in number, were largely the work of James Ussher.* Though in general agreement with the Lambeth Articles of 1595, they reflected Ussher's Calvinism and the spirit of Puritanism which then prevailed in Trinity College, Dublin. They had also a Presbyterian flavor, for they made no reference to the prelatic orders of bishop, priest, and deacon. Their strong emphasis on predestination and reprobation was to many a stumbling block. Though approved by the convocation and ratified by the lord deputy in 1615, they were replaced twenty years later by the English Thirty-Nine Articles,* largely due to the efforts of Wentworth and John Bramhall, bishop of Derry. Though never used since then, they were never repealed.