Inquire


Bibliography

R. de Vaux, Ancient Israel (1961), 349-353.

I.N.R.I. These letters constitute the abbreviation of the supposed Lat. inscr. on the cross of Jesus: Iesus Nazarenus Rex Iudaeorum—“Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews.” All four gospels mention the inscr. but vary as to the contents. The traditional Lat. wording of the title seems to be based on John 19:19 rather than on the synoptic parallels. The abbreviation INRI is ascribed by tradition to Helena, Emperor Constantine’s mother, who claimed to have discovered it on a board (with the three crosses found in a cave identified as the holy sepulchre. Cf. Ecclesiastical History of Sozomen, II, 1-2). It appears in paintings of the crucifixion by M. Munkacsy, F. Pesellino, Ed. Burne-Jones.

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia (1915)

(sha’al, "to ask," "desire"; zeteo, "to seek"); A form sometimes employed with reference to the practice of divination, as where Saul "inquires of" (or "consults") the witch of Endor as to the issue of the coming battle (1Sa 28:6,7) (see Divination).

In Job 10:6, "to inquire (baqash) after iniquity" signifies to bring to light and punish for it, and Job asks distractedly if God’s time is so short that He is in a hurry to find him guilty and to punish him as if He had only a man’s few days to live.


"To inquire (baqar) in his temple" (palace) means to find out all that constant fellowship or unbroken intercourse with God can teach (Ps 27:4).

Pr 20:25 warns against rashness in making a vow and afterward considering (baqar, "to make inquiry") as to whether it can be fulfilled or how it may be eluded.

In the King James Version, the translation of several Greek words: diaginosko, "to know thoroughly" (Ac 23:15); epizeteo, "to seek after" (Ac 19:39); suzeteo, "to seek together" (Lu 22:23); exetazo, "to search out" (Mt 10:11).