Henry Parry Liddon

1829-1890. Anglican preacher. Born in London and educated at Oxford, he became a member of the Tractarian* group after the secessions to Rome. He exercised great influence both as a professor and administrator in Oxford, but his real fame rests on his preaching from the pulpit of St. Paul's as one of its canons over the last two decades of his life. Steeped though he was in the ethos of Oxford, Liddon nonetheless succeeded in the requirements of a popular preacher. This is not to say he was shallow or flashy. He marshaled his vast learning, strong logic, lucidity, and sense of order, and his sustained grasp of ideas within strictly controlled and methodically developed structures and expressed them in prose that was brilliantly expressive and finely modulated. He had, in particular, a fine ear for the effects of inversion and a falling close, and a ready memory for apt and succinctly narrated illustrations. In his Oxford sermons, sometimes taking as long as eighty minutes to deliver, he provided exhaustive treatments of theological topics in a closely argued and deeply scholarly manner.