Henry Hammond

1605-1660. Anglican divine. Born at Chertsey, Surrey, and educated at Eton and Magdalen College, Oxford, he was ordained in 1629 and in 1633 was appointed rector of Penhurst, Kent. His ten years of parish ministry helped to prepare him to defend and explain the doctrine and practice of the Church of England in the revolutionary period, 1640-60. Returning to Oxford during the Civil War, he was appointed by the king, whose faithful servant he became, to a canonry at Christ Church in 1645. During the Parliamentary Visitation he lost this, and eventually settled down at Westwood in Worcestershire. He excelled as a writer and is chiefly remembered for his Practical Catechism (1644) and Paraphrases and Annotations on the New Testament (1653). Most of his numerous controversial tracts are printed in his Miscellaneous Theological Works (4 vols., 1847).