Harim

HARIM (hā'rĭm, Heb. hārim, consecrated or slit-nosed)



HARIM hâ’ rĭm (חָרִ֔ם, consecrated). A family name. 1. A lay family that returned from the Babylonian captivity with Zerubbabel, and after marrying foreign wives put them away and renewed the covenant with Nehemiah (Ezra 2:32; Neh 7:35).

2. A priestly family that returned from the Babylonian captivity with Zerubbabel, some members of which also married foreign wives and then put them away and renewed the covenant with Nehemiah (Ezra 10:21; Neh 10:5). First Chronicles mentions a family with this name who were members of the third course of priests.

3. Nehemiah 3:11 tells of Malchijah the son of Harim who with Hasshub, the son of Pathath-moab, repaired a section of the wall of Jerusalem; but it is not clear to which of the above two families named Harim he belonged.

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia (1915)

A family name.

(1) A non-priestly family that returned from captivity with Zerubbabel (Ezr 2:32; Ne 7:35); mentioned among those who married foreign wives (Ezr 10:31); also mentioned among those who renewed the covenant (Ne 10:27).

(2) A priestly family returning with Zerubbabel (Ezr 2:39; Ne 7:42; 12:3,15 (see Rehum)); members of this family covenanted to put away their foreign wives (Ezr 10:21; Ne 10:5). A family of this name appears as the third of the priestly courses in the days of David and Solomon (1Ch 24:8).

(3) In Ne 3:11 is mentioned Malchijah, son of Harim, one of the wall-builders. Which family is here designated is uncertain.