Go

"Go" ("went," etc.) occurs very frequently in the English Bible, and is the translation of a great many different Hebrew and Greek terms. As the word implies movement of all kinds, physical and mental, it has naturally many applications.

1. In the Old Testament:



2. In the New Testament:


"Go about (to)" the King James Version is the translation of zeteo, "to seek," in Joh 7:19, "Why go ye about to kill me?" the Revised Version (British and American) "Why seek ye?" and Ro 10:3; of peirazo, "to try," "attempt" (Ac 24:6, the Revised Version (British and American) "assayed"), and of peiraomai (26:21, the Revised Version (British and American) "assayed"), of epicheireo "to lay hands on" (Ac 9:29), which remains in the English Revised Version unchanged, the American Standard Revised Version "seeking"; "to let go" is the translation of apoluo "to loose off" or "away" (Lu 14:4, etc.), "to go astray," of planao (Mt 18:12, etc.).

Various other words occurring singly are translated by forms of "go," e.g. phero, "to bear on," the King James Version "Let us go on unto perfection" (Heb 6:1, see below); epiduo, "to go in upon," "Let not the sun go down upon your Wrath" (Eph 4:26).