Consolation

CONSOLATION (Gr. paraklēsis, encouragement, comfort). In the thought behind this word the “consolation of Israel” looked for by Simeon (Luke.2.25) is linked with the famous “comfort” mentioned by Isaiah in a passage about the fulfillment of the promises (Isa.40.1ff.). Yet “comfort” is more positive than “console,” as can be seen in the description of the Holy Spirit as “the Comforter” (John.14.16-John.14.17 kjv), and of Barnabas as “Son of Encouragement” (Acts.4.36, rsv, niv).


CONSOLATION תַּנְחוּמוֹת, H9487, comforts; תַּנְחוּמִים, H9488, comforts; παράκλησις, G4155, consolation, comfort). Eliphaz says to Job, “Are the consolations of God too small for you?” (Job 15:11), meaning, Do they seem beneath your deserts and notice? Job says to his friends that the consolation he asks from them is that they listen to him (Job 21:2). Jeremiah foretells that many in the land of Israel shall die, but no one will give the “cup of consolation” (meaning the cup of wine administered as a refreshment) to a bereaved person who mourns for his parents.

When it is said of Simeon that he looked for the “consolation of Israel” (Luke 2:25), the word “consolation” is used by metonymy for the Messianic salvation that will bring consolation to the people of Israel.

Jesus says that the rich are doomed to misery, for they have already received their consolation from the riches in which they have trusted. They have no treasure in heaven (Luke 6:24).

The word παράκλησις, G4155, is tr. in the KJV “consolation,” but in the RSV it is usually rendered “comfort,” or sometimes “encouragement” (Acts 4:36; Rom 15:5; Phil 2:1; Heb 6:18) and “exhortation” (Acts 15:31).

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia (1915)

"Consolation of Israel" (Lu 2:25), refers to the fulfillment of the promises in Isa 40:1 ff. See Comfort. "Son of consolation" (Ac 4:36 the King James Version and the American Revised Version, margin).

See Barnabas.