Cauda

CAUDA (kow'da). A small island lying about twenty-five (forty-two km.) miles to the south of Crete (Acts.27.16; kjv “Clauda”) and now called Gavdo. Here Paul and his companions were almost wrecked on their journey toward Rome.


CAUDA kô’ də (Καυ̂δα, G3007). Cauda (Acts 27:16) is the modern Gaudhos or Gozzo, an island lying some 50 m. off the southern coast of Crete and the same distance E of the longitude of the western end of Crete. In the KJV it is called Clauda. Paul’s ship was coasting under Crete to escape the southward driving blast of the meltemi which had precluded a direct crossing of the Aegean, but had given a following wind for the pilot’s attempt to round Crete and make westward progress under its lee. But when the ship reached the western half of the long island, the wind, pressing on the N of the mountainous mass which forms that region, spilled over in downdrafts which were disastrous. It was only when the ship, struggling to avoid too much southward drift, came under the lee of Cauda briefly that they were able to haul in the ship’s boat, which towing behind, disrupted steering.

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia (1915)

An island 23 miles West of Cape Matala. It is a small island, and can never have supported a large population, or have been of any importance. Its elevation to the rank of a bishopric in Byzantine times must have been due to its association with the voyage of Paul. The ship with Paul on board was driven under the lee of Cauda (Ac 27:16); in the calm water south of the island the crew succeeded in hauling in the boat, undergirding the ship and slackening sail.