Why We Trust Our Bible

The uniqueness and authority of the Bible are always under attack. Professors and writers are claiming that Jesus never existed, Jesus never claimed to be God, the early church changed the basic preaching of Jesus, books were left out of the Bible, the copies of the Bible that have come down through the centuries are hopelessly corrupt, and how can you trust your translation where there are so many? This class walks you through the process of how we received our Bible and why we can trust it.

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Lectures

Canon (Dr. Michael J. Kruger)

21

How would you answer common objections that are often raised about the canon?

Textual Criticism (Dr. Daniel Wallace)

22

The challenges to the believability of the Bible brought by the issues related to the Greek manuscripts, and especially the influence of Dan Brown and Bart Ehrman.

23

Discussion of the historical process that led to manuscripts and variants, with some examples of variants.

24

Wallace responds to three basic challenges by Bart Ehrman: the "black hole"; the quality of the copies; the effect of Constantine on the manuscripts.​

25

Now that we understand why there are variants in the manuscripts, how does the art and science of textual criticism help us determine which variants are most likely to be original?

26

A brief overview of why the King James Bible is different from all modern translations, and issues of the Greek texts behind it.

27

In this final talk, Dr. Wallace focuses in on variants, how many there are, how many significant variants are there, and how good of a job has textual criticism done. We also asked Dr. Wallace to share some on his work at The Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts.

Can we Trust our Translations (Dr. Bill Mounce)

28

Dr. Mounce begins the seminar by talking about how we use words and grammar to communicate within our historical context. This is the theoretical basis for the rest of the seminar.

29

Do you translate words or meaning? At one level, all translations translate for meaning. However, every translation has to decide if they want to err on the side of words or the side of meaning. (Bill references "12" principles, but shortened the presentation to "10.")

30

Four more principles of translation that stem from the basic decision of translating words or meaning. 

31

Four more principles of translation that stem from the basic decision of translating words or meaning. 

32

This is the most difficult issue in modern translation. For many people, the words "he" and "man" refer to all people, men and women alike. But for many others, "he" and "man" only refer to males. This is not an issue of conservative or liberal. English is in the middle of a significant shift on how it uses these words, and others like "they."

Elder Training (Dr. John Piper)

33

The importance of inspiration and inerrancy for our belief in the Bible.

34

The writings of the apostle Paul are a significant part of the New Testament. The Westminster Confession includes a concise statement about why the Bible is the Word of God.

35

The scope and cohesiveness of the message of the Bible is remarkable, considering it was written over a period of hundreds of years by over 40 different authors.

36

Manuscript evidence indicates that we have the words of the authors. Jesus, the apostles and the authors of the Old Testament claim that Scripture was written by people who were inspired by God.

37

Scriptures manifest themselves to be the word of God by their light and power to convince and convert sinners. The Spirit of God, bearing witness by and with the Scriptures in the heart of man, is alone able fully to persuade it that they are the very word of God.

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Speakers

Duration

20 hours