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William Wilberforce

1759-1833. Slave trade abolitionist. Born in Hull, where his house still stands as a museum to him, he was educated first at Hull Grammar School where he came under the influence of [[Joseph Milner]],* the headmaster, and his brother Isaac. The latter used to lift the small boy onto the table so that the other scholars could hear him read with his beautiful voice. When he had been less than two years at the school, his father died; he went to live at Wimbledon with an aunt who was a staunch Methodist. His mother wanted to remove him from religious influences of this kind and brought him back to Yorkshire, where he went as a boarder to Pocklington School. At the age of fourteen he wrote a letter to a York paper about the evils of the slave trade. He largely wasted his time at St. John's College, Cambridge, but when he was twenty-five he met [[Isaac Milner]]* at Scarborough and invited him to come to Europe with him. He was converted through their conversation and study of the NT