Samuel Marinus Zwemer

1867-1952. “Apostle to Islam.” Born in Michigan to a Dutch Reformed family, the thirteenth of fifteen children, he became a Student Volunteer when Robert Wilder* visited Hope College after the Mt. Hermon conference-and became a leader in the movement. At seminary he and James Cantine planned to start a mission in the world's most difficult field. The outcome was the Arabian Mission. Cantine went out in 1889, Zwemer in 1890. They concentrated on the Arabian Gulf area. In 1894 the Reformed Church in America assumed responsibility for the mission. In 1906 and 1911 Zwemer organized and chaired general conferences on Islam at Cairo and Lucknow. In 1911 he started The Moslem (now Muslim) World, and edited it for forty years. From 1913 to 1929 he made Cairo his center, worked with the Nile Mission Press, and traveled throughout the Islamic world, including India and NW China. From 1929 he had a ministry of teaching, first at Princeton Theological Seminary, later at Biblical Seminary in New York and the Missionary Training Institute at Nyack. He was also a gifted writer and authored some fifty books.