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Rhodes

RHODES (rōdz, Gr. Rhodos, rose). A large island off the mainland of Caria, some 420 square miles (1,077 sq. km.) in extent. Three city-states originally shared the island, but after internal tension and conflict with Athens, which lasted from 411 to 407 b.c., a federal capital with the same name as the island was founded. Rhodes controlled a rich carrying trade, and after the opening of the east by Alexander, became the richest of all Greek communities. It was able to maintain its independence under the Diadochi, or “Successors,” of Alexander. Rhodes, over this period, became a center of exchange and capital and successfully policed the seas. Coming to terms with the rising power of Rome, Rhodes cooperated with the Republic against Philip V of Macedon, and Antiochus of Syria (201-197). In the third Macedonian war Rhodes adopted a less helpful attitude, and in spite of the protest of Cato, preserved in one of the earliest samples of Latin oratory, the state was punished by economic