Miter

(Gr. mitra, “turban”). A form of hat or headdress, made of embroidered satin and worn by bishops and some abbots in the Western Church. In the East they wear metal crowns. The usage goes back to the eleventh century and to the camelaucum, the papal tiara. Worn at all solemn services and occasions, but taken off during prayers and the canon of the Mass, it is found in three types. First, the Precious Miter, worn on Feasts and ordinary Sundays and adorned with precious stones and/or gold. Second, the Golden Miter, used in penitential seasons and made of golden cloth. Third, the Simple Miter, worn at funerals and on Good Friday and made of plain white silk or linen. Since the nineteenth century, Anglican bishops have also used them. They are shaped like a shield.