John Bramhall

1594-1663. Irish archbishop and primate. Born at Pontefract, Yorkshire, he attended a local school, then entered Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge (1608). He came under the influence of the master, Samuel Ward, who represented the Church of England at the Synod of Dort in 1621 and from whom he derived his Anglo-Catholic leanings. After eight brilliant years at Cambridge he had two brief pastorates in Yorkshire. Marriage to a wealthy lady enabled him to devote his time to reading and study. His leadership in the Church of England seemed assured when he was appointed a high commissioner by Charles I. He was invited to undertake the difficult task of reorganizing the Church in Ireland, and was successively archdeacon of Meath (1633), bishop of Derry (1634), and archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland (1660). Jeremy Taylor* preached his funeral sermon. He used his great gifts as speaker in the Irish House of Lords, in brilliant controversies with Hobbes, Baxter,* and the Puritans generally, and as one of the outstanding preachers of his day. His bitter opposition to Cromwell led to exile from 1648 to 1660.