James Bowling Mozley

1813-1878. Anglican theologian. Educated at Grantham Grammar School and Oriel College, Oxford, he early acquired the reputation of a formidable if ponderous academic theologian. He was closely associated with the Tractarians* and was joint editor of the Christian Remembrancer. The Gorham case, however, caused him to reexamine baptismal theology more profoundly, and in A Treatise on the Augustinian Doctrine of Predestination (1855) and A Review of the Baptismal Controversy (1862) he conceded the validity of the Evangelicals' case, and was thereby estranged from many of his former colleagues. By this time he was agitated by the dire effects of unorthodox thinking within his church and, as a reply to Dean Stanley and his followers, gave the Bampton Lectures on Miracles in 1865, which defended miracles in a traditional manner reminiscent of Bishop Butler. Mozley was made a regius professor of divinity at Oxford in 1871 and died, a rather isolated figure, seven years later.