Charles John Vaughan

1816-1897. Dean of Llandaff, Wales. Educated under Thomas Arnold at Rugby, and at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he was elected fellow in 1839, Vaughan was ordained in 1841. After a short period in Leicester he became headmaster of Harrow, which he raised from some sixty ill- disciplined boys to a flourishing and well-organized school between 1844 and 1859. When vicar of Doncaster (1860-69) he began training young men for the ministry, who were known as “Vaughan's doves,” continuing this work after he became master of the Temple (1869-94). Among his 450 pupils was the future archbishop, Randall Davidson. Vaughan was a good parish priest and an exceptionally fine preacher, his expository sermons being impressively delivered with strong conviction. He was hostile to High Church practices and to the contemporary German critical views of the Bible. When dean of Llandaff (1879-97) he refused several offers of preferment. His Nonconformist sympathies brought close links with the founding in 1883 of University College, Cardiff. He left strict instructions that no biography of him should be written.