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Caesarea

CAESAREA (sĕs'a-rē'a). A city built between 25 and 13 b.c. by Herod “the Great” at a vast cost and named in honor of his patron [[Augustus Caesar]]. It lay on the coast of the Mediterranean about twenty-five miles (forty-two km.) NW of the town of Samaria, which Herod had rebuilt and renamed “Sebaste,” also in honor of Augustus. Herod intended it as the port of his capital, and a splendid harbor was constructed. Great stone blocks were used to top the reefs that helped to form the harbor. Being the military headquarters for the Roman forces and the residence of the procurators, it was the home of Cornelius in whose house Peter first preached to the Gentiles (Acts.10.1-Acts.10.48). It was the place of residence of Philip the evangelist with his four unmarried prophesying daughters (Acts.8.40; Acts.21.8-Acts.21.9), who entertained Paul and Luke and their party on their return from the third missionary journey. Later it was the enforced residence of Paul while he was a prisoner for two