Bruise

BRUISE (חַבּוּרָה, H2467, a stripe or blow; דָּקַק, H1990, to grind; NT κα̂τακόπτω, to cut, to beat). A bruise, also known as a contusion, is an injury to body tissue arising from the impact of an object possessing a blunt surface. It presents no loss of body tissue substance and no break in the skin. It is associated with tissue reaction in the form of effusion of blood and tissue juices into the tissue spaces beneath the skin. Recovery from a bruise is effected by the gradual liquefaction and absorption of these damaged tissues and their replacement with scar and, in some instances, with newly formed tissue similar to the injured tissue. During the healing the bruised area often changes in color from a bluish-gray to a green and then to a yellow hue, until absorption is complete. (See Isa 1:6; 53:5, 10).

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia (1915)

brooz, broozd: The noun occurs in Isa 1:6 the King James Version, "bruises and putrifying sores," as the translation of chabbarah. The verb translations a number of Hebrew words, the principal ones being:

(1) shuph (Ge 3:15 (twice));

(2) daqaq (Isa 28:28 (twice) (the American Standard Revised Version "ground," "and though the wheel of his cart and his horses scatter it, he doth not grind it" for the King James Version "nor break it with the wheels of his cart, nor bruise it with his horsemen"));

(3) dakha’, in the classical passage, Isa 53:5, "He was bruised for our iniquities," Isa 53:10, "Yet it pleased Yahweh to bruise him";

(4) ratsats, "A bruised reed shall he not break," Isa 42:3 (quoted in Mt 12:20).

In the New Testament bruise is the translation of sparasso, "to rend" (the American Standard Revised Version "bruising him sorely") Lu 9:39; of suntribo, "to break to pieces" (Mt 12:20); "shall bruise Satan under your feet shortly" (Ro 16:20); of thrauo in Lu 4:18 in the quotation from Isa 58:6, "to set at liberty them that are bruised" (WH omits the verse).

Arthur J. Kinsella