Treasury,

See also Treasury

(’otsar, usually; ganzakh, 1Ch 28:11; gazophulakion, korbanas):

1. Origin of the Treasury:

The need of a "treasury" in connection with the house of Yahweh would early be felt for the reception of the offerings of the people, of tithes, and of the spoils of war dedicated to Yahweh. Already in Jos 6:19,24, therefore, we read of a "treasury of the house of Yahweh," into which "the silver and gold, and vessels of brass and iron," taken at Jericho, were brought. In the reign of David, and in his plans for the future temple, great prominence is given to the "treasuries." In 1Ch 26:20 ff are given the names of those who were over "the treasures of the house of God," and over "the treasures of the dedicated things" ("the spoil won in battles," 26:27), the latter being applied "to repair the house of Yahweh."

2. The Solomonic Temple:


3. The Second Temple:

The Book of Ne introduces us to treasury-chambers in the second temple--now used for the voluntary offerings (tithes) of the people--grain, and wine, and oil (Ne 13:4 ff; compare Mal 3:10). A certain Meshullam had repaired the city wall "over against his chamber" (Ne 3:30), and he, with other Levites, kept "the watch at the storehouses of the gates" (Ne 12:25). These gates were probably gates of exit on the southern side, as in the Herodian temple.

4. Herod’s Temple in the New Testament:

In Herod’s temple the name "treasury" was specially given to the "court of the women" (see TEMPLE, HEROD’s), where were 13 trumpet-shaped boxes for the reception of the offerings of the worshippers. It was here that Jesus saw the poor widow cast in her two mites (Mr 12:41; Lu 21:1-4), and the court is expressly named the "treasury" in Joh 8:20: "These words spake he in the treasury, as he taught in the temple." It is a legitimate deduction that this court was the ordinary scene of the Lord’s ministry when teaching in the temple.

See also TREASURE, TREASURER, TREASURY.

W. Shaw Caldecott