John of Paris

c.1250-1306. Preacher and early conciliarist. Also known as John Quidort, he was born and educated in Paris. Joining the Jacobins,* he established a reputation for brilliance as an apologist for Thomism and respondent to William de la Mare's Correctorium fratris Thomae. A popular preacher and lecturer on Peter Lombard's Sentences, he was stripped of these offices near the end of his life for his writings on the Eucharist and the papacy. De potestate regia et papali (1302) anticipated conciliarist positions by advocating Christ as head of the church, collegiate authority, and deposition of the pope under certain circumstances. His interpretation of Christ's presence at the sacrament approximated consubstantiation and influenced Lutheran thought. He died in Bordeaux while appealing his suspension to the pope.