Honorius of Autun

c.1090-c.1156. Monk and writer. Describing himself as a priest and teacher (“Scholasticus”), he was a well-known writer-over 500 manuscripts of his works have survived. Although a monk with solitary inclinations, he showed a lifelong interest in the outside world. He wrote books on liberal education, he defended the right of ordained monks to preach and to exercise sacramental functions, and his popular Imago Mundi dealt with astrology, astronomy, geography, and history. Honorius was a Christian Platonist and a great admirer of John the Scot. He wrote widely on religious and theological matters. His Elucidarium, in its three books on God, man, and paradise, ranged from evil and free will to a variety of contemporary problems which he dealt with very sensibly. He wrote also on the Virgin Mary's intercessionary powers, the Liturgy, the Psalter, the Song of Songs, and papal supremacy. Various other writings condemned ecclesiastical abuses-simony, clerical marriage, misuse of ecclesiastical offices, and the ordination of illiterates. It appears now that his Latin name, Augustodensis, links him not with Autun in Burgundy, but with Regensburg in S Germany.