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Vocabulary for Interpretation (Part 2)

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Lesson

It's important to define your terms when you are determining the interpretation and application of Biblical passages. Your goal is to begin by hearing the message of a passage as the author intended it and the first readers would have understood it. 

Outline

A Vocabulary for Interpretation (part 2)

I. Significance

A. Defined

B. Applied

II. Subject matter

A. Defined

B. Applied

III. Understanding

A. Defined

B. Applied

IV. Interpretation

A. Defined

B. Applied

V. Mental acts

A. Defined

B. Applied

VI. Norms of language

A. Defined

B. Applied

VII. Norms of utterance

A. Defined

B. Applied

VIII. Literary genre

A. Defined

B. Applied

IX. Context

A. Defined

B. Applied

X. Discussion of Klein, Blomberg and Hubbard on Meaning

A. Our goal remains to hear the message of the Bible as the original audiences would [should] have heard it or as the first readers would [should] have understood it.

B. We are convinced that the goal of hermeneutics is to enable interpreters to arrive at the meaning of the text that the biblical writers or editors intended their reader to understand. (pg. 97)

C. We presuppose the goal of hermeneutics to be the meaning the biblical writers ‘meant’ to communicate at the time of the communication, at least to the extent that those intentions are recoverable in the texts they produced. (pg. 98)

D. Though a given passage may be capable of being understood in several ways, our goal is to determine what (of those various possible meanings) the text most likely would have meant to its original readers because that is why people communicate: they intend for what they communicate to be understood as they communicated it. (pg. 133)

E. The meaning of a text is: that which the words and grammatical structures of that text disclose about the probable intention of its author/editor and the probable understanding of that text by its intended readers. (pg. 133)