Free Online Bible Classes | Who Were Westcott & Hort?

Who Were Westcott & Hort?

Please Log in to Attend this Lecture

Please log into your free account so you can attend this lecture.

Create account    Login

Lesson

This lecture describes Westcott and Hort, and how they dethroned the Textus Receptus by proving that the Textus Receptus was late, inferior, and secondary.

Outline

I. BROOKE FOSS WESTCOTT (1825-1901)

A. Trained at Cambridge University in classical Greek and Latin

B. Voluminous writer

C. Evangelical

II. FENTON JOHN ANTHONY HORT (1828-1892)

A. Hulsean Professor of Divinity, then Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity, Cambridge

B. Moderate but not evangelical

C. 1881-1882: Westcott and He published The New Testament in the Original Greek

III. WESTCOTT AND HORT’S NT: EYE OF THE STORM

A. Strong reaction by Dean Burgon who falsely attached Westcott–Hort

B. Burgon’s followers made falacious ad hominem arguments, all of which are false

1. G.A. Riplinger, New Age Bible Version (1993) confuses B.F. Westcott with W.W. Westcott who was involved in the occult

2. Falsely claim Westcott denied the deity of Christ

3. Falsely claim Westcott denied the resurrection of Christ

4. Falsely claim Hort denied all sorts of cardinal doctrines

C. What about Hort?

1. More difficult to determine but probably not as orthodox as Westcott

2. Ironically, considered a ‘papist’ by some KJV Only folks, but so was Erasmus

IV. WESTCOTT-HORT’S WORK

A. 28 years of incessant labor, and immediately claimed as a major advance in understanding he transmission of the NT

B. Three basic arguments against TR/Byzantine text

1. No distinctive Byzantine readings in ante-Nicene Fathers; thus, late

2. Byzantine readings not supported by intrinsic evidence (author) or transcriptional evidence (scribe); thus, inferior

3. Only the Byzantine text-form conflates; thus, secondary

a) Luke 24.53

b) Luke 9.10

V. SUMMARY

A. Late — no ante-Nicene distinctive Byzantine readings

B. Inferior — no good readings internally

C. Secondary — always recipient of other readings to make a conflate reading